FAQ Search
Memberlist Usergroups
Profile
  Forum Statistics Register
 Log in to check your private messages
Log in to check your private messages
Moonpod Homepage Starscape Information Mr. Robot Information Free Game Downloads Starscape Highscore Table
300
Goto page 1, 2, 3  Next
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Discussion Pod Forum Index -> Film Talk View previous topic :: View next topic  
 Author
Message
Fost
Pod Team
Pod Team


Joined: 14 Oct 2002
Posts: 3734



PostPosted: Thu Jun 01, 2006 12:27 pm    Post subject: 300 Reply with quote

So: some facts about me:

favourite historical story: The 300 Spartans and the battle of Thermopylae.
favourite comic book author: Frank Miller.

Naturally, Frank Miller's comic book '300' which depicts the above story, is one of my all time favourites.

So, when I heard about this:
http://300themovie.warnerbros.com/

I got excited and apprehensive in equal measure.

If they mess this up, I'll be really annoyed. Production shots at least are looking cool, but if it's another Troy I'll weep. Doesn't look like there's any major stars like Brad Pitt in it though, so they won't have to build a film pandering to their vanity.
Back to top
View user's profile Visit poster's website
Magnulus



Joined: 08 Nov 2005
Posts: 556
Location: Bergen, Norway



PostPosted: Thu Jun 01, 2006 3:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well, the bearded guy with the astonishingly defined torso gave Lara Croft a hickey in Cradle of Life, so I guess at least the cast has notoriety among the gamer kids.

( I have to say, I'm one of the few people who seem to actually enjoy the Tomb Raider films. They're fun and actiony and cheesy. Oh, and they have Chris Barrie, which is always a plus.)
Back to top
View user's profile Visit poster's website MSN Messenger
jollyreaper



Joined: 20 Jun 2003
Posts: 181



PostPosted: Mon Jun 05, 2006 3:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've gotten quite a bit tired of Frank Miller. He's striking me more and more as a one note artist.

The definitive fictional depiction of Thermopylae has to be "The Gates of Fire" by Stephen Pressfield.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0553580531/002-2065225-1100858?v=glance&n=283155

Miller's comic is superficial and feels crass, uninspired. Pressfield's version is intimate, horrific, and inspiring.

Quote:
Go tell the Spartans, stranger passing by, that here obedient to their laws we lie.
Thus reads an ancient stone at Thermopylae in northern Greece, the site of one of the world's greatest battles for freedom. Here, in 480 B.C., on a narrow mountain pass above the crystalline Aegean, 300 Spartan knights and their allies faced the massive forces of Xerxes, King of Persia. From the start, there was no question but that the Spartans would perish. In Gates of Fire, however, Steven Pressfield makes their courageous defense--and eventual extinction--unbearably suspenseful.

In the tradition of Mary Renault, this historical novel unfolds in flashback. Xeo, the sole Spartan survivor of Thermopylae, has been captured by the Persians, and Xerxes himself presses his young captive to reveal how his tiny cohort kept more than 100,000 Persians at bay for a week. Xeo, however, begins at the beginning, when his childhood home in northern Greece was overrun and he escaped to Sparta. There he is drafted into the elite Spartan guard and rigorously schooled in the art of war--an education brutal enough to destroy half the students, but (oddly enough) not without humor: "The more miserable the conditions, the more convulsing the jokes became, or at least that's how it seems," Xeo recalls. His companions in arms are Alexandros, a gentle boy who turns out to be the most courageous of all, and Rooster, an angry, half-Messenian youth.

Pressfield's descriptions of war are breathtaking in their immediacy. They are also meticulously assembled out of physical detail and crisp, uncluttered metaphor:

The forerank of the enemy collapsed immediately as the first shock hit it; the body-length shields seemed to implode rearward, their anchoring spikes rooted slinging from the earth like tent pins in a gale. The forerank archers were literally bowled off their feet, their wall-like shields caving in upon them like fortress redoubts under the assault of the ram.... The valor of the individual Medes was beyond question, but their light hacking blades were harmless as toys; against the massed wall of Spartan armor, they might as well have been defending themselves with reeds or fennel stalks.

Alas, even this human barrier was bound to collapse, as we knew all along it would. "War is work, not mystery," Xeo laments. But Pressfield's epic seems to make the opposite argument: courage on this scale is not merely inspiring but ultimately mysterious. --Marianne Painter --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

From Publishers Weekly
Pressfield's first novel, The Legend of Bagger Vance, was about golf, but here he puts aside his putter and picks up sword and shield as he cleverly and convincingly portrays the clash between Greek hoplites and Persian heavy infantry in the most heroic confrontation of the Hellenic Age: the battle of Thermopylae ("the Hot Gates") in 480 B.C. The terrifying spectacle of classical infantry battle becomes vividly clear in his epic treatment of the Greeks' magnificent last stand against the invading Persians. Driven to understand the courage and sacrifice of his Greek foes, the Persian king, Xerxes, compels Xeones, a captured Greek slave, to explain why the Greeks would give their lives to fight against overwhelming odds. Xeones' tale covers his years of training and adventure as the loyal and devoted servant of Dienekes, a noble Spartan soldier, and he describes the six-day ordeal during which a few hundred Greeks held off thousands of Persian spears and arrows, until a Greek traitor led the Persians to an alternate route. Rich with historical detail, hot action and crafty storytelling, Pressfield's riveting story reveals the social and political framework of Spartan life?ending with the hysteria and brutality of the spear-thrusting, shield-bashing clamor that defined a Spartan's relationship with his family, community, country and fellow warriors. Literary Guild and Military Book Club selections; film rights sold to Universal Studios for George Clooney and Robert Lawrence's Maysville Pictures; UK rights to Bantam, Spanish rights to Grijalbo Mondadori, Italian rights to Rizzoli.
Copyright 1998 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.


This is one of my favorite books of all time. Of course, it's a shame that Pressfield's lightning could not strike twice. His second Greek epic based on the Pellopennesian Wars (I think I mangled the spelling there) was wholly unsatisfying. I think that part of the problem there is he tried using the same storytelling techniques as with Gates of Fire but with a war that spanned decades and a large cast of characters, there was little time to develop the same kind of familiarity we had as with the Spartans and the overall story lacked theme and purpose. True, life does not have an orchestrated purpose, events and coincidences do not occur for any cosmic meaning, but that sort of randomness makes for a poor story.
Back to top
View user's profile
Fost
Pod Team
Pod Team


Joined: 14 Oct 2002
Posts: 3734



PostPosted: Mon Jun 05, 2006 5:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

jollyreaper wrote:
The definitive fictional depiction of Thermopylae has to be "The Gates of Fire" by Stephen Pressfield.

I know I'm in a minority saying this (just check out the imdb forums on 300) but Gates of Fire is in my top 5 most dull books ever. It was pure pain for me getting through it; I'd probably have given up if I wasn't so interested in the subject matter. I just felt that all the time he kept trying to spell out to me how much research he'd done - like the whole part about Spartan tree ****. Oddly enough, Herodotus book 8 which covers the battle I found far more fun to read (perhaps because there's that bell ringing in the back of your head that he was closer to the truth than anyone will ever be again), although it's far too brief.

Miller's comic - isn't supposed to be a literary masterpiece, it's more of an operatic version of events, and a study in brutality. I find most people who read Gates of Fire don't like it though.

Note: Nobody should ever go off what I say about books - I have a really poor attention span for books. Lord of the Rings being another book I just can't be bothered with - got half way through the Two Towers 3 times before giving up out of boredom. Smile
Back to top
View user's profile Visit poster's website
icarus
Troll
Troll


Joined: 01 Mar 2004

Location: Olympia Washington



PostPosted: Mon Jun 05, 2006 8:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

jollyreaper wrote:
I've gotten quite a bit tired of Frank Miller. He's striking me more and more as a one note artist.

The definitive fictional depiction of Thermopylae has to be "The Gates of Fire" by Stephen Pressfield.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0553580531/002-2065225-1100858?v=glance&n=283155

Miller's comic is superficial and feels crass, uninspired. Pressfield's version is intimate, horrific, and inspiring.


And they call ME a troll.
Back to top
View user's profile Visit poster's website
InaneAndMatu



Joined: 26 Jun 2005
Posts: 25



PostPosted: Wed Jun 07, 2006 2:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Fost wrote:
Note: Nobody should ever go off what I say about books - I have a really poor attention span for books. Lord of the Rings being another book I just can't be bothered with - got half way through the Two Towers 3 times before giving up out of boredom. Smile

I got about 3 pages into the first LOTR, trust me when I say you're not alone in that.

And on the Frank Miller side, he's done some great stuff (SinCity), but he's definitely got a bad side when it comes to writing (The Daredevil comics he wrote).
Back to top
View user's profile
Doom III



Joined: 20 Apr 2004
Posts: 117



PostPosted: Wed Jun 07, 2006 11:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

InaneAndMatu wrote:
The Daredevil comics he wrote.


i think he was held back by marvel or dc>i forget who when he wrote dd

but elektra was great i thought
Back to top
View user's profile
jollyreaper



Joined: 20 Jun 2003
Posts: 181



PostPosted: Sat Jun 17, 2006 8:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Books aren't for everyone and even people who like books won't like all genres. But if you like books and like historical fiction, this should be up your alley.
Back to top
View user's profile
Fost
Pod Team
Pod Team


Joined: 14 Oct 2002
Posts: 3734



PostPosted: Wed Oct 11, 2006 8:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

http://300themovie.warnerbros.com/

Even if the film turns out to be total rot, the teaser trailer looks splendid.!

I can't wait now...
Back to top
View user's profile Visit poster's website
icarus
Troll
Troll


Joined: 01 Mar 2004

Location: Olympia Washington



PostPosted: Wed Oct 11, 2006 10:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

So far it looks like the Manliest movie ever made.

Kicking people down wells, lesbians, ugly people, ARROWS BLOTTING OUT THE SUN!*, Rampaging Rhinos....

KICK ***!




*EVERY movie needs this.
Back to top
View user's profile Visit poster's website
Fost
Pod Team
Pod Team


Joined: 14 Oct 2002
Posts: 3734



PostPosted: Wed Oct 11, 2006 10:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

icarus wrote:
ARROWS BLOTTING OUT THE SUN!*


"Then we shall fight in the shade".

Possibly the coolest line you'll ever find in a history book...


How much of a psycho is that guy playing Leonidas!!! I remember watching Return of The King, and thinking that Theoden's pre-battle speech needed a bit more of a kick to it, but this guy has gone to the other extreme!

He should deliver all his lines like that:

Leonidas goes to the cafe:

Leonidas: Cup of tea please.
Waiter: Do you take sugar?
Leonidas: YES! I TAKE FIVE! BECAUSE I AM A SPARTAN!
Back to top
View user's profile Visit poster's website
icarus
Troll
Troll


Joined: 01 Mar 2004

Location: Olympia Washington



PostPosted: Thu Oct 12, 2006 12:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

SPARTANS NEED NO SHUGAR!
Back to top
View user's profile Visit poster's website
Magnulus



Joined: 08 Nov 2005
Posts: 556
Location: Bergen, Norway



PostPosted: Thu Oct 12, 2006 5:30 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Of course they do, where do you think they get their energy? Very Happy
Teaser looks completely awesome. I'm going to go watch it again.
Back to top
View user's profile Visit poster's website MSN Messenger
Poo Bear
Pod Team
Pod Team


Joined: 14 Oct 2002
Posts: 4121
Location: Sheffield, UK



PostPosted: Fri Dec 08, 2006 9:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

http://playlist.yahoo.com/makeplaylist.dll?id=1529799&sdm=web&qtw=480&qth=300


best film ever?
Back to top
View user's profile Visit poster's website
SethP



Joined: 24 Apr 2006
Posts: 302
Location: Connecticut, USA



PostPosted: Fri Dec 08, 2006 11:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Poo Bear wrote:
http://playlist.yahoo.com/makeplaylist.dll?id=1529799&sdm=web&qtw=480&qth=300


best film ever?


Quite possibly.

The only question I have is how similar will the movie be to the actual historical events of Thermopylae. It looks like a great movie regardless, but there's always that small, naive part of me that hopes, this time, Hollywood will actually read a history book Razz
Back to top
View user's profile MSN Messenger
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Discussion Pod Forum Index -> Film Talk All times are GMT
Goto page 1, 2, 3  Next
Page 1 of 3

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group