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90% piracy rate for World of Goo
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Konedima
Grammar Police
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Joined: 25 Oct 2003
Posts: 1068
Location: Sydney, Land of Censorship



PostPosted: Sat Nov 15, 2008 8:09 am    Post subject: 90% piracy rate for World of Goo Reply with quote

http://2dboy.com/2008/11/13/90/
Ouch.

I haven't bought World of Goo yet. I played the demo and I think it's fun, but not $20 US worth of fun. I'll get around to buying it sometime though.
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Slyh



Joined: 25 Nov 2004
Posts: 480
Location: Karlsruhe, Germany



PostPosted: Sat Nov 15, 2008 1:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I don't know... is this a lot? 1 out of 10 bought the game. That does not sound that bad. I'd say that hardly anybody of the rest would have bought the game if it was not available as illegal copy.

If I was the game developer it would bug me that 90% pirated the game, of course. But it does not mean that the game would have sold better, I guess.
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Poo Bear
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Joined: 14 Oct 2002
Posts: 4121
Location: Sheffield, UK



PostPosted: Sun Nov 16, 2008 10:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Oh no, a piracy debate - eek!

It's often said that piracy doesn't really matter, because the people pirating wouldn't buy anyway. Working as a developer "on the inside" I know a lot of developers who've looked into this and done anecdotal research i.e. they release one game with no drm and one with or they turned drm off for a while. I'm not saying this irrefutable fact, just what I believe, a lot of developers prefer not to release information on the experiments they've run for fear of angering people with such a flame bait subject.

The results seem to actually follow common sense (if we're honest about human nature). If something is easily available, for free with no chance of punishment then a large minority of people who would have paid for it will instead take it illegally. They aren't evil and they aren't criminals who'd steal your wallet, they are just normal people who fall to temptation.

I think developers do a disservice to the public when they make it super easy for people to do the wrong thing, it's irresponsible of the developers in my opinion. It would be like the cinema sacking all its staff and putting a sign at the door saying "please put right money in tin". It isn't how our society works.

On the other hand, people should not be penalised for doing the right thing. By that I mean we shouldn't get obsessed with pirates, they'll always be there. DRM should always favour the legit customer even if that means we can't use the most effective techniques in DRM.

Stardock are clever. They don't use what we'd recognise as DRM. Instead they put a major percentage of the budget into post release updates and the only way to get those updates is through the secured downloader system. So the Internet quickly spreads the word that the basic games aren't really where the value is, it's the updates and community. It's just enough to make people think that copying the basic game isn't really worth it. Sadly, most devs don't have the budget to do it Sad Plus the games are aimed at a more mature audience (highly complex simulation) who tend to have more disposable income and be less inclined to suffer the viruses and **** that pirating entails.
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Mystryon



Joined: 17 Jan 2004
Posts: 24



PostPosted: Fri Dec 05, 2008 7:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

You know the more I think about it, I think that publishers use DRM not so much for piracy, but for producing numbers about their games. It makes no sense to use something that would annoy your paying customers so much, that really doesn't hamper pirates.


As far as it being easy to get your hands on something pirated that doesn't have DRM vs. something that does... If this were many years ago, that might mean something, but now a days, the gaming public is well versed on the use of the internet.

The way I see it, if someone wants to pirate a game that has DRM , they have to do it on the internet, if someone wanted to pirate a game that didn't have that, it would either be on the internet, or borrowed from a friend. But in that respect atlest someone bought the game..\

But I'm with you guys, if a publisher wants to put something in, to make themselvs feel warm and gooey on the inside, make it easy, go back to cd keys or something. I used to hate installing a multi disc game, and then being told to put disc whatever back in at the end, and then after that to put disc number 1 in, but I'd rather have to go through that then goto reinstall a game down the road sometime and find I can't because the developer says no way Jose
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Konedima
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Joined: 25 Oct 2003
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PostPosted: Sat Dec 06, 2008 10:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

It seems Spore is the most pirated game of 2008.
http://torrentfreak.com/top-10-most-pirated-games-of-2008-081204/
You'd hope that this would make the publishers realise that DRM (especially DRM as draconian as Spore's) doesn't work, but since this is the screwed up world we live in and not some magical land where people with power use it to do things that make sense, they'll use it as an excuse to put more restrictive DRM on their games, probably one which revokes your ability to play the game if somebody sneezes within 100 metres of your computer. It would be as effective as current DRM (i.e. not) and only give you slightly less rights with what you spend good money on than you already have.
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Poo Bear
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Joined: 14 Oct 2002
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PostPosted: Mon Dec 08, 2008 6:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

EA will just sit down with the accountant and it will go one of two ways:

1. yeh, that PC port made a decent profit over its development/marketing budget, shame about the piracy and negative DRM press. Ok, let's take the next iteration further over into the online space. Really make the game worthless if you don't have access to the totally secure online aspects. Obviously not an MMO or anything daft, just big up the community aspects and content downloads, see what cooks with the masses online.


2. we lost money on that PC version, we might brake even, but it's bad. Ok, lead on the console ports next time. Cut the next PC skew budget in half and if we have to farm it out over seas to get it made then so be it. Oh, and keep an eye out for any new uber DRM that might be available.
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icarus
Troll
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Joined: 01 Mar 2004

Location: Olympia Washington



PostPosted: Mon Dec 08, 2008 11:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It seems it is not posible to sell informarion. From a digital standpoint a game is just information.

I think the companies will lose the DRM wars and in the future we will not buy games but subscribe to online services which alow us to play games.
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Mystryon



Joined: 17 Jan 2004
Posts: 24



PostPosted: Sun Dec 14, 2008 3:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yeah the online service thing is most likely, there are places that work like that now. I think Microsoft even at one point was trying to do some research into putting everything online, and the user only having a basic terminal to access it.
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Poo Bear
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PostPosted: Sun Dec 14, 2008 9:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

That process is under way already. Albany - you get all the apps and space online to store everything, I think it's about $70 a year, not sure. As soon as you stop paying they stop working.

"With just a few clicks, “Albany” subscribers will be able install the whole package, which includes Microsoft Office Home and Student 2007, giving them the latest versions of Word, Excel, PowerPoint and OneNote for their personal and school projects; Windows Live OneCare to help keep viruses at bay and their computer fast and healthy; and Windows Live Mail, Messenger and Photo Gallery so they can connect and share with others. Albany also installs the Microsoft Office Live Workspace connector on the Microsoft Office toolbar, so users can save documents to their own dedicated online workspace and invite friends and classmates to collaborate and share."

http://www.microsoft.com/presspass/features/2008/apr08/04-18albany.mspx


With windows7 some previously pre-installed components like outlook email, movie maker and photo gallery are no longer there. They are part of Windows Live Essentials. Still free, but you have to register and download. Other apps have been added and the whole lot has online sharing functionality and presumably more online storage.

I think it's a slow process to ease people into paying for everything via subscription, moving their data online and using online apps. I think it's a good thing as long as there is decent competition from Google and others to keep the service free/cheap/fair. Should make piracy a lot harder and even mean you don't need such an expensive computer, plus it makes it easier to use multiple computers and work anywhere.
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codergames



Joined: 20 Apr 2010
Posts: 167



PostPosted: Tue Apr 20, 2010 4:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ouch ... I'm a new independent game developer and if the situation is that bad, my first game may be the last one Sad

I heard about Goo winning the independent game competition ... pirates just have no soul ... instead of pirating the companies, the sharks who are killing us, and instead of helping us, they're shutting down independent spirit.

I want to develop games that are fun to play and not violent, I don't like companies imposing their ways to us. Pirates should just limit themselves to companies and their games and leave the rest of us alone.
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codergames



Joined: 20 Apr 2010
Posts: 167



PostPosted: Tue Apr 20, 2010 4:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

And why did you name your game "Word Pirate"? The first thing that came to my mind was piracy.
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Poo Bear
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PostPosted: Tue Apr 20, 2010 5:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Smile

It's a game about pirates where you play a pirate.

Shiver me timbers!!
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codergames



Joined: 20 Apr 2010
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PostPosted: Tue Apr 20, 2010 6:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

hahaha ... I know, but still after I saw the game title on front page and then came here reading the title and posts ... its hard not to think of piracy Sad ... its horrible when someone puts large effort into building the game ... and then ...
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Slyh



Joined: 25 Nov 2004
Posts: 480
Location: Karlsruhe, Germany



PostPosted: Wed Apr 21, 2010 4:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

codergames wrote:
hahaha ... I know, but still after I saw the game title on front page and then came here reading the title and posts ... its hard not to think of piracy :( ... its horrible when someone puts large effort into building the game ... and then ...

Please inform yourself.
Not everyone who copies a game would have bought it in the first place. (I'd even go so far as to say that most of the pirates wouldn't have.) While piracy certainly is somewhat of a problem, there is no hard science that supports the theory that it really hurts the business.
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codergames



Joined: 20 Apr 2010
Posts: 167



PostPosted: Thu Apr 22, 2010 1:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It does hurt, because I was contacted by an interested party and he obviously wanted to play the game and was ****** because he could not find the game on torrents Smile))

Here it is, read his comment:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=am1e275Q1ZU

Now, he's waiting for the torrent to come out or he purchased the game, but I'm not sure as I only had few purchases, the game was released 2 weeks ago.
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